Marinated White Bean and Tuna Salad [RECIPE]

Be Fit Basics: Marinated White Bean and Tuna Salad

Adapted from Cooking Light

1 tbsp capers, liquid drained
1 tbsp flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
Juice from a lemon
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp butter, melted
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp black pepper
2 (~5 oz) cans of tuna
1 can (15 oz) white beans, liquid drained

Instructions:
Combine the first 7 ingredients in a small bowl by mixing them together with a whisk or fork (this will be the dressing for the salad).  Break up the canned tuna gently with your hands and place it in a medium bowl. Add the white beans and dressing to the tuna and toss gently with a spoon to fully combine.

Notes:
– This is a great recipe to make ahead of time, as the flavors will continue to develop in the refrigerator.

Yield: 4 servings

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

CALORIES: 250 calories
PROTEIN: 23 g
SODIUM: 645 mg
CARBOHYDRATE: 17 g
FIBER: 5 g
FAT: 11 g
Sat Fat: 3 g

MAKE IT A MEAL

Entrée: 1 serving white bean and tuna salad
Starch: 1 whole wheat pita (140 calories)
Vegetable: Butter lettuce leaves (5 calories for 1/8 head of lettuce)
Vegetable (and dip): 1 cup of red or green pepper slices (15 calories) with ¼ cup hummus (100 calories)

You can serve the marinated salad nestled in some lettuce leaves or inside the pita with lettuce leaves.

GROCERY SHOPPING LIST
Flat leaf parsley
1 lemon
1 head of butter lettuce (romaine or red leaf lettuce can be substituted)
Red or green peppers (about 1 small pepper per person)
1 (15oz) can of white beans
2 cans (~5oz each) of tuna
Hummus
Bottle of capers
Butter
Whole wheat pita
Condiments: olive oil; salt; black pepper

USE OF LEFTOVERS
– Toss leftover tuna and beans with pasta and serve as a cold pasta salad.

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Emily Gelsomin is a Clinical Nutrition Specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital. As a registered dietitian, she counsels medical nutrition therapy on an outpatient basis and works extensively with the hospital's employee wellness program, Be Fit. She is also a freelance food writer and is currently pursuing her master's degree in Gastronomy, a multi-disciplinary food studies program that examines the holistic role of food in historical and contemporary societies, at Boston University.

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