Recipe: Curried Chicken Salad

 

This slightly sweet spiced chicken salad is satisfying and crunchy. It works equally well sandwiched between two slices of whole grain bread as it does scooped on top of a bed of greens.

Be Fit Basics: Curried Chicken Salad

1/4 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1.25 pounds skinless chicken breast, raw (or about 4-5 ounce breasts)
1.5 tbsp olive or canola oil
1/2 cup mayo
1/2 cup plain, low fat Greek yogurt
1 tbsp lemon juice, freshly squeezed (about ½ a small lemon)
1 1/2 tbsp curry powder *
1 large apple, chopped
1 celery stalk, diced
1/3 cup raisins

* Start off with less curry powder than is listed if you prefer more mildly spiced meals.

Instructions:
Season the chicken breasts with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet on medium high heat and add the oil when the pan is hot. Add the chicken breasts to the pan and cook about 4 minutes per side, until they are golden brown and the inside of the breasts reach 165 degrees. Refrigerate the breasts until fully chilled and then roughly chop them. (Alternatively, you could use previously cooked and chilled chicken breasts.)

Combine the chopped chicken with the remaining ingredients, stirring thoroughly to combine.

Yield: 6 servings

Nutritional Information Per Serving:
CALORIES: 275 calories
PROTEIN: 23 g
SODIUM: 360 mg
CARBOHYDRATE: 18 g
FIBER: 2 g
FAT: 13 g
Sat Fat: 2.5 g

Grocery Shopping List:
1.25 pounds of raw skinless chicken breast
Mayo
Low fat Greek yogurt
Apples
1 lemon
Celery
Raisins
Whole grain bread
Condiment Pantry: olive or canola oil, kosher salt, pepper, curry powder spice blend

Make it a Meal:
Entree: 1 serving curried chicken salad
Starch: 2 slices whole grain bread (220 calories)
Vegetable: 10 celery sticks (5 calories)
Fruit: 5 apple slices (60 calories)

Leftovers: Put a scoop of leftover chicken curry salad on top of a bed of greens.

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Our Be Fit Nutritionists are comprised of dietetic interns studying at Massachusetts General Hospital. During their internship, they receive training on acute care nutrition, ambulatory and community nutrition, food service systems management, and research. Their comprehensive work is done in collaboration with registered dietitians.

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